World Suicide Prevention Day

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On World Mental Health Day 2019, our minds turn to the toll many people’s work has on their mental health. Unfortunately, despite the best efforts of our employers, our workplaces can often be toxic for us.

If I were to ask you to name the things that are most important to your business, you would likely have ‘people’ right up there near the top. After all, you’ve probably invested heavily in acquiring and nurturing the right talent.

You’ll no doubt agree with me that happy teams full of staff that enjoy coming to work do better and contribute to the company thriving. But the reality is that the workplace can be taking a severe toll on employees. Despite appearances, many are finding it harder to come into work than they should.

You are doing well but are always looking for that bit extra to drive competitive advantage and profitability. But what else could you do?

Well, the answer isn’t so far away from where you’ve already been investing your time and money. It’s all about your employee’s mental health. That’s the key. It makes sense for your business, and it makes sense for your people.

Research has shown that UK businesses lose between £33 Billion and £42 Billion per annum due to poor mental health.

One of the biggest causes of sick leave is mental health. Although its probably recorded in a self-certification as a cold, flu or the dreaded diarrhoea due to the stigma attached to admitting something like anxiety or depression. A report by ACAS estimated that mental ill-health, including stress, depression and anxiety contributed in the UK to 91 million lost working days each year, more than for any other illness. No wonder so many colleagues complain that there are not enough staff to do the job. Quite a few of them are missing.

Those were the days lost that were identifiable because you could tell that employees were off sick. Worse still will be the impact of the employees that are affected by mental ill-health and are actually at work. You won’t be able to count those so quickly because the employees turned up, but they are likely severely underperforming.

Presenteeism is what happens when poor mental health distracts your staff. Some are recognisable because it is clear that your employees left their minds and enthusiasm at home. For others, the reduction in performance, the error rate or levels of risk taken are likely increasing, but its harder to spot or quantify.

Employees that are affected by depression and anxiety will often perform as well as anyone else. Many will be highly functioning. It’s not as simple as testing everyone and moving those that test positive to one side, focusing only on the so-called ‘healthy employees’. Nor is it simply a case of providing education, support lines for after it goes wrong, or training every other employee to be a mental health first aider, although they have their role.

In order for an organisation to be at it’s very best, it needs to value its employees and nurture their mental health.

Organisations benefit when they understand that employees are human, with moods and feelings that go up and down. A successful organisation will know words such as empathy and compassion and won’t need to sacrifice productivity or be “softer” to achieve results.

Successful organisations can achieve levels of collaboration and resilience that can not only boost the bottom line, but also give its staff, their families and friends a much needed boost too. Those are organisations where staff want to go to work and where they can focus on what’s in front of them from day to day. Most of all, they’ll know that if something happens in their lives, they’ll be able to talk to their peers and managers and receive the support they need.

Get in touch with Flexmind today and find out from our business and mental health experts how you can transform your organisation to one with motivated, productive staff generating increased revenue and reduced operating cost.

World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD), on 10 September, is organized by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP). The purpose of the Day is to raise awareness that suicide can be prevented. WHO is a co-sponsor of the day.

In past years, more than 300 activities in around 70 countries were reported to the IASP. Activities included educational and commemorative events, press briefings and conferences, and social media campaigns.